Marquetry furniture by Gregg Novosad

Posted By on July 29, 2010

Gregg NovosadThese amazingly detailed furniture pieces are made by Gregg Novosad from Palatine, Illinois, US.

Gregg Novosad are a self-taught master, who received his basic knowledge of woodworking as a child, watching his dad build cabinets in his garage with the simplest of tools.

He did his first marquetry in 2005. Before that, he had tried a joinery, turning, wood bending and shaping.

Gregg Novosad created his own style of decorative veneering “storylining” by using basic storytelling techniques of character, conflict, and resolution in his marquetry designs.
This, along with an infusion of wry humor, added a new dimension to his functional furniture art that could put a smile on people’s faces.
For example, he said about his “Birds of Frey” buffet:
“Birds of Frey is perhaps my coming of-age piece. The 18th century style breakfront buffet sports 21 menacing birds in eight major panels. The birds are all trying to dismantle the inlay, fraying the edges and elements. Attempting to defend the piece are inlays of my daughter, playing tug of war with one bird, my son, shooting a bird with a dart gun, and my wife and I, on the top panel doing our bit to save the inlay from the birds. In addition to the ones inlaid in the piece, four more cast, gilded birds sit atop a pierced wooden basket weave gallery, waiting their turn to attack.”
His collectors case “Ole` Boulle” is tribute to great 1700`s cabinet master Andre`-Charles Boulle.

More of his works can be seen on his website:  www.clickdivine.com
and here is interview with Gregg Novosad by Michael Dresdner:  www.woodworkersjournal.com

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One Response to “Marquetry furniture by Gregg Novosad”

  1. RE- Entrepod says:

    WOWWWWWW, that detail on the inlays is gorgeous. this is what you call an art dealer to see when you have an estate sale.

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